Peanut and egg allergies may disappear at school age City of Health Berlin

About three out of ten peanut allergies and nine out of ten egg allergies go away by the age of six. This is shown by an Australian long-term study. Chances are lower in children with severe eczema or multiple allergies.

About three out of ten peanut allergies and nine out of ten egg allergies go away by the age of six. This is shown by an Australian long-term study. The researchers found that the chances are lower in children with severe eczema or more food allergies. The results were published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

The researchers evaluated data from the HealthNuts study. It monitors the prevalence and course of allergic disease in 5,276 children admitted for vaccination between 2007 and 2011 at the age of one year. They have been tested for food allergies.

Peanut and egg allergies can go away in school age

Food allergy tests were repeated at time intervals, followed by oral food challenge tests or new tests for patients with new symptoms – after 2 years (eggs only), 4 years and 6 years. At the same time, the parents filled in the questionnaires.

At the age of 1 year, 156 children were allergic to peanuts. In 29 percent, it disappeared at the age of 6, ie around school age. At the age of 1 year, 471 children had an allergy to eggs (raw eggs). It disappeared in 89 percent within 6 years.

Higher risk of persistent allergies

Persistent peanut allergies were more common in children who had severe eczema, were allergic to at least one tree nut in addition to peanuts, and had a prick test that showed pimples 8 mm or larger.

Persistent egg allergies were more likely in children who developed pimples 4 mm or larger in a skin prick test, had a peanut or sesame sensitization, severe eczema, and were also allergic to fried or baked eggs.

At the age of 1 to 6 years, 0.7 percent of children developed an allergic reaction to peanuts and 0.09 percent of children developed an allergy to raw eggs. At age 6, peanut allergy had an overall prevalence of 3.1 percent and egg allergy had an overall prevalence of 1.2 percent.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.