Macron’s electoral alliance is apparently about to lose an absolute majority

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Macron’s electoral alliance clearly missed the absolute majority in the parliamentary elections

President Emmanuel Macron votes in Le Touquet, where the family's summer residence is located President Emmanuel Macron votes in Le Touquet, where the family's summer residence is located

President Emmanuel Macron votes in Le Touquet, where the family’s summer residence is located

Source: dpa / Michel Spingler

The election alliance around President Emmanuel Macron appears to have weakened from the second round of the French parliamentary elections. According to initial screenings, candidates from his middle camp occupied less than half of the 577 seats.

FAccording to projections, the re-elected French President Emmanuel Macron and his central camp clearly missed the absolute majority in the parliamentary elections and received a standing ovation. In Sunday’s final round of parliamentary elections, the Liberals reached 230 to 250 out of 577 seats. The new left-wing alliance, led by left-wing politician Jean-Luc Mélenchon, will have 165 to 175 seats in parliament. An absolute majority required at least 289 seats.

The result is a big blow to Macron, whose camp currently holds an absolute majority in the lower house of parliament. Usually, parliamentary elections held shortly after the presidential election are considered confirmation, so the same political force often wins with an absolute majority. The new left-wing alliance and Mélenchon, on the other hand, achieved tremendous success, giving them more influence as the strongest opposition group.

Jean-Luc Melenchon, the left-wing candidate, cast his vote in Marseilles

Jean-Luc Melenchon, the left-wing candidate, cast his vote in Marseilles

Source: dpa / –

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French Prime Minister Elisabeth Borne also cast her vote in the polling station in Condé-Sur-Vire.

French Prime Minister Elisabeth Borne also cast her vote in the polling station in Condé-Sur-Vire.

Tito: dpa / Sameer Al-Doumy

In the parliamentary elections, Macron discussed whether he would be able to implement his plans in his second term. To do this, he needed a majority in parliament. Now, with a relative majority, the president and government are forced to seek support from other camps. Depending on the project, they will try to rely on center-left or center-right forces.

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Parliamentary elections in France

Although many French people were dissatisfied with Macron’s first term, the 44-year-old benefited from the fact that parliamentary elections in France were seen as confirmation of the presidential election. Traditionally, the winner’s supporters take part in the voting, the others often stay at home. Nevertheless, the left-wing alliance was able to mobilize enough supporters to complicate matters for the president.

French right-wing populist Marine Le Pen welcomed the Rassemblement National’s unexpectedly good performance in parliamentary elections. Her party will form “the largest faction in the history of (her) political family” in the National Assembly, she said in Hénin-Beaumont on Sunday. According to surveys, the party currently has six to 60 to 100 seats.

Mélenchon said it was “an electoral failure of macronism.” Government spokeswoman Olivia Gregoire said the evenings were better. “It’s an unsatisfactory first place, but it’s still the best place.”

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Hotel staff Rachel Keke (owner) and baker Stéphane Ravacley (center) compete for nupes and against Macron (v.).

Macron on Tuesday before traveling to Romania and Ukraine appealed to citizens to exercise their right to vote. “In these turbulent times, the choice you make on Sunday is more important than ever,” he said. “Nothing would be worse than adding French chaos to the chaos of the world.”

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